DTNS 2471 – The Guitar Hero We Need, Not the One We Deserve

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comPatrick Beja is on the show and we’ll bring on Russ Pitts to talk about the new Guitar Hero Live and how it’s almost the exact opposite of Rock Band 4.

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If you enjoy the show, please consider supporting the show here at the low, low cost of a nickel a day on Patreon. Thank you!

Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme!

Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo!

Thanks to our mods, Kylde, TomGehrke, sebgonz and scottierowland on the subreddit

Show Notes

Today’s guests:  Patrick Beja and Russ Pitts

Headlines: 

TechCrunch reports that Apple’s 26th annual Worldwide Developer Conference is scheduled for June 8th through June 12th at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. Starting today devs can sign up for a random selection process to get a ticket. Devs will be notified by April 20th whether or not they get to pay $1,599 to attend. Possible announcements at WWDC could include, OS upgrades, a new music streaming service, maybe some Apple TV hardware, and maybe even the SDK for Apple Watch Apps.

TechCrunch reports Microsoft began replacing Lync with Skype for Business as part of the Office 2013 April update.  Skype for Business resembles regular Skype but has enterprise-grade security and administration features.  The transition will be complete by the end of May.

CNET has the news that Google has launched a new program called “Designed For Families” which identifies apps in the Google Play store that Google deems safe for children. To earn the family friendly label, app makers must go through a review process that includes receiving a rating of “Everyone” or “Everyone 10+” from the Entertainment Software Rating Board, and making sure the app complies with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act. App makers can begin to apply now, and consumers should see the label in a few weeks.

The Next Web reports Opera Mini’s latest Android browser has a scalable interface that works with high-resolution screens, as well as options to customize the layout for larger devices.  The main menu has been simplified and the Speed Dial feature redesigned. Other updates include a new private browsing mode, a refreshed discover newsfeed that brings more new content from the Web and a counter to show you how much data you’ve saved.

Apple made its open-source ResearchKit tools for developers available today. The kit allows developers to create apps intended for medical and health-related research. Modules in the kit include Participant consent, Surveys and Active Tasks. Some applications were created prior to the public release that have enrolled 60,000 users in studies related to asthma, breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Parkinson’s disease.

The Next Web reports that Netflix is beginning to add narration tracks for the visually impaired today. The narrations describe the movements, facial expressions, costumes and scene changes. The first series to get the additional narration is Daredevil to be followed by shows like House of Cards and Orange is the New Black.

The net neutrality lawsuits continue. Added to one filed yesterday by the USTelecom organization, The Verge reports the CTIA, NCTA and American Cable Association have all filed suits now as well. In addition, Ars Technica reports US Rep. Doug Collins introduced a “Resolution of Disapproval” regarding the Open Internet Order which would use Congress’ fast track powers to cancel the FCC rules. While it is likely to pass, it is also likely that the President will veto it.

The Net Neutrality fight is just getting underway in India and TechCrunch reports it took its first victim.  Flipkart announced it will withdraw from Airtel Zero, a platform that would’ve given Bharti Airtel subscribers free data for services that paid to be in the program.

Cloud communications company Twilio has launched Twilio Video according to The Next Web,to make it easier for developers to embed real-time video experiences into apps and websites and such. The service uses WebRTC and leverages Twilio’s existing data centers to handle up to 4 people on a call, unlimited video connections, low latency relay calls and full optimization for iOS and Android users. Although no pricing was mentioned the company said that there will “always be a free tier of usage”. Interested parties can register for a private beta today.

 

News From You:

Doorsrio and KAPT_Kipper send us this ray of sunshine for victims of the CoinVault ransomware. PC World has a story on a new tool released by Kaspersky Lab that exploits decryption keys uncovered on a CoinVault command and control server during an investigation by Dutch police. Kapersky researcher Jornt van der Wiel said the tool isn’t 100% effective but police hope to uncover more keys as their investigation continues. No arrests have been made in connection with the CoinVault ransomware operation but the perpetrator is believed to reside in the Netherlands.

Goofball_jones posted the Ars Technica report about an opinion piece written by industry analyst Jack Gold and published by Verizon. Gold makes the fair point that if everyone had unlimited data and used it fully networks would suffer. He also argues that users don’t require more data and wouldn’t want to pay for the infrastructure to deliver it anyway. Network management company Sandvine’s CTO Don Bowman has said Data caps do not do a very good job of managing congestion.

 

Discussion Section Links:  

http://www.wired.com/2015/04/guitar-hero-live/
http://www.wired.com/2015/03/rock-band-4/
http://www.polygon.com/2015/4/14/8407161/guitar-hero-live-news-hands-on

 

Pick of the day:

Jack wrote in saying:

“I have been a long time listener since your buzz out loud days and know you have mentioned Audible over the years and just found out something I did not know before. Audible has an option to stream your books on a browser. This is such a great little surprise for us chromebook users like myself that I can now pop the headphones on and listen to books as I surf the web and my 5 year old claims my phone as his own.”

Messages:

Ian writes:

Dear Tom,

I just donated to your Patreon because I feel like I give back some value before I insert my opinion and potentially take up air time. I love the show and the coverage you guys give to wearables, even if you’re skeptical of smartwatches. I wanted to write in just to remind folks that wearables is a much broader category than just smartwatches. While, as you noted, most of the products in this sector are aimed at women, there are a growing number of products that aren’t gender specific. I’ve compiled a short list of some wearables that are not smartwatches for you and your listeners:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1B6iDb3YLa5mlKumVRmWggCtVMXeAN1WrIMg2nfJGC9k/edit?usp=sharing

 

Garin writes in:

Hey Tom, Jenny and Patrick,

I am emailing in response to the story in the headlines yesterday from Ars Technica (and covered widely across the internet) about TWC increasing internet speeds in Charlotte, NC in response to Google Fiber. I just wanted to point out that they might have rolled this out “early” in response to Google, but this particular instance it is not necessarily anything new.

I have Time Warner Cable in LA County (Santa Clarita, by Magic Mountain) and we got these exact speed increases a year ago. Coworkers of mine also got these increases in Pasadena and Covina, so it appeared to be the wider LA area. At the time I researched it and discovered it was actually rolling out as a pilot program in LA and NY (Press release here.) So this increase has probably been in the works for a while, and will likely come to many other (if not every) Time Warner area in the near future.

I just wanted to email in and point out that a story that seemed to blow up all over yesterday was really less of a deal than it looked (Although I totally get that it has happened previously in other instances.)

Love the show and am a proud Patron!

 

Nathan the school tech in weird weather Washington (state) sent us this email:

Hi Tom

I do network and desktop support in a medium-large school district.

I agree that some form of punishment for the student involved is warranted (the original suspension seemed reasonable).

A large portion of the responsibility for the incident lies with the teacher as well as whoever was allowing the use of completely insecure passwords for administrative access to the computer.

The adults in the area are responsible for attempting to prevent the irresponsible, dumb things children do because they are children. When a child does gets caught breaking the rules their behavior should be corrected.

When a teacher creates or allows a situation to continue that leads to inappropriate student behavior, they need some serious correcting as well.

=====

Tuesday’s guests: Natali Morris

DTNS 2470 – Felony Wallpaper

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comRoger Chang is on the show today to talk about 4K phone screens, whether changing a background image should be a felony, and the many faiths of the Reddit Button.

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Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org.

Please SUBSCRIBE HERE.

A special thanks to all our Patreon supporters–without you, none of this would be possible.

If you enjoy the show, please consider supporting the show here at the low, low cost of a nickel a day on Patreon. Thank you!

Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme!

Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo!

Thanks to our mods, Kylde, TomGehrke, sebgonz and scottierowland on the subreddit

Show Notes

Today’s guests: Roger Chang

Headlines: 

The US FCC’s Open Internet Order was published in the Federal Register today. A trade group representing ISPs called USTelecom filed suit in the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Sharp announced a 5.5 inch 4K IGZO display with an 806 pixels per inch density according to phone arena.com. The Ultra-HD display will sport a resolution of 2160 x 3840. IGZO or Indium gallium zinc oxide is a semiconducting material used in the TFT Backplane of flat-panel displays. Rival smartphone maker Samsung has hinted at a 4K display for their upcoming Galaxy Note 5.

Engadget reports that ASUS is getting ready to launch the VivoWatch, a fitness-centric wearable with a claimed 10 day battery life. The watch will have a tough stainless steel body, your standard IP67 rating against dust and water, heart-rate monitoring and sleep tracking. No price has been revealed yet, but expect that info to emerge during Milan Design Week which begins tomorrow.

Ars Technica reports on a shocking case of potential cause and effect in the free market. After Google Fiber announced its expansion into Charlotte, North Carolina, Time Warner Cable announced that their residential internet customers will “experience” internet speed up to six times faster than their current speed, at no extra cost. Customers who get up to 15Mbps will now receive up to 50Mbps, those who get up to 30Mbps will now receive up to 200Mbps; and customers who get up to 50Mbps, will receive up to 300Mbps, all at no extra charge.

TechCrunch reports Apple updated Final Cut Pro X, Motion and Compressor software, with support for new camera hardware, and new 3D animation resources and effects features. Final Cut Pro 10.2 supports four video scope views at once, and support for additional video formats. Motion 5.2 adds improvements to 3D title building, and 12 new generator effects. Compressor 4.2 makes it easier to get a movie up for sale on iTunes. CNET reports Apple also sold about 1 million Apple Watches this weekend according to analyst estimates.

TechCrunch reports 3D Robotics launched a new quadcopter called the Solo meant to be easy to fly for beginners, with a focus on aerial photography. Pilots can use a GoPro to stream video to a phone through the 3-axis Solo gimbal. The Solo can update firmware over WiFi and has an accessory bay for future hardware expansion, like a forthcoming Lidar camera. The motor pods are also swappable for easy replacement. The Solo costs $999 and the Gimball an extra $399 coming to the US in May and globally in June and July.

The Financial Express reports Singapore-based FireEye released a report about online espionage operations targeting government and commercial organizations going back to 2005. FireEye believes the group responsible is state-sponsored likely by the Chinese government. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman, Hong Lei “I want to stress that the Chinese government firmly bans and cracks down on all forms of hacker attacks,” and called for international cooperation against such attacks.

 

News From You:

AllanAV sent us this story from the Slate. 14-year-old eighth-grader Domanik Green of Paul R. Smith Middle School in Holiday, Florida, was recently arrested and charged with a felony: offense against a computer system and unauthorized access. He was released from Land O’Lakes Detention Center on Wednesday. The Tampa Bay Times reports that the Pasco County sheriff’s department took action after Green used a teacher’s administrative password, a person’s last name which he saw the teacher type in – to log onto a school computer and change the background image. “I logged into a teacher’s computer who I didn’t like and tried putting inappropriate pictures onto his computer to annoy him,” Green told the Times.

StarFuryZeta alerted us to a Gizmodo post about Mysterious Radio Signals being received by astronomers at the Parkes Observatory in Australia for years. Astronomers were puzzled over the source of these brief but intense bursts. Astronomer Emily Petrol installed a real-time radio interference monitor and it turns out they were coming from the microwave in the lunch room anytime someone opened the door before the timer was done.
Paulgannon01 sent us The Next Web report that in the UK, new regulations are in effect providing legal recourse to people subjected to “revenge porn.” The new offence criminalizes “the disclosure of photographs or films which show people engaged in sexual activity or depicted in a sexual way, where what is shown would not usually be seen in public,” The sharing must be done deliberately with the intention of causing the person in question distress.

Discussion Section Links:  

http://boingboing.net/2015/04/13/reddits-hot-button-game.html
http://www.theverge.com/2015/4/11/8388797/old-spice-twitch-nature-adventure-marketing-stunt
http://np.reddit.com/r/EncyclopediaButtonica/comments/31xq68/a_brief_history_of_the_button/
https://www.reddit.com/r/thebutton
http://www.reddit.com/r/thebutton/comments/312lwm/official_button_push_regret_thread/
http://boingboing.net/2015/04/05/realtime-chart-of-the-button.html
https://www.reddit.com/r/thebutton/wiki/index
http://button.mtsanderson.com/index_orig.html
http://www.unwinnable.com/2013/10/07/salty-bet/#.VSwF2xPF8wz 

 

Pick of the day:

Dear Tom,
After hearing the pick from DTNS 2452 concerning RiffTracks, I wanted to expand on the selection of commentaries available online. Zarban.com (quoting from the website)

is a catalog of audio commentaries for movies and TV episodes available on the Web. You can download a commentary and listen to it while you watch the show and enjoy the scholarly insights and/or hilarious insults they offer.

They are mostly fan-made commentaries but some are official tracks (e.g. Aronofsky’s “The Fountain” commentary that he originally hosted personally is now archived by Zarban.com). Other contributors can be hit and miss, but I would highly recommend What Are You Doing Movie (formerly Down In Front), Tysto, and Film Grok. They generally have a countdown after a short minutes of introduction, and listeners can sync their copies with the recorded commentary audio.

At the time of this correspondence, Tysto has a commentary for “Resevoir Dogs” that I am very much looking forward to visiting. Listeners can also find entries for such gems as “Nightmare Sisters,” if that’s their bag.

PATRON since day 1:

Nic in Louisiana

Messages

Good day Tom,
I work for high tech manufacturing company like your guest, and single source parts are actually more common than your guest suggested. He was giving the text book answer.

It’s often normal with anything cutting edge to only have one vendor. And sometimes it’s easier too, especially if you have a relationship with a vendor who performs better than others.

Keep in mind that marketing’s plan is forward looking, and their dreams might not match what’s possible on a new product. They should dream. The goal normally is to reach marketing’s plans, not the other way around.

Natron

 

DTNS 2469 – Intel’s New Supercomputer is Cray

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comDarren Kitchen is on today to comment on Amazon’s drone delivery testing approval and react to news of a promised head transplant. Len Peralta has the job of trying to draw an illustration representative of today’s conversation.

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A special thanks to all our Patreon supporters–without you, none of this would be possible.

If you enjoy the show, please consider supporting the show here at the low, low cost of a nickel a day on Patreon. Thank you!

Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme!

Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo!

Thanks to our mods, Kylde, TomGehrke, sebgonz and scottierowland on the subreddit

Show Notes

Today’s guests:  Darren Kitchen from Hak5 & Len Peralta

Headlines: 

Did everybody who wanted to order an Apple Watch first thing last night get to? Good. Standard themes of sell-outs, shipping dates slipping to 4-6 weeks and reported website issues apply as to all Apple launches. The same applies to the new gold MacBook.

Meanwhile the Galaxy S6 went on sale in South Korea, home of the electronics giant, as well as Europe, the United States and markets in the Asia-Pacific such as Australia, Singapore and India.

The Washington Post reports on The Citizen Lab’s analysis of DDoS attacks on GitHub and GreatFire which they’re calling “Great Cannon”. While the “Great Firewall” attempts to block traffic from coming past it, the Great Connon attempts to make sites inaccessible. The Citizen Lab believes the Cannon could also be used to deliver malware. The only defense against it to encrypt more Web traffic. The Great Cannon appears to leverage infrastructure from China. A Chinese Embassy Spokesman said “China firmly opposes and combats any form of cyberattack in accordance with law.”

 Ars Technica reports Amazon launched a marketplace for desktop apps as a service Friday. Subscriptions start at $25 a month for a virtual Windows 7, something like Office 2013 Professional Plus adds $15 a month. Amazon released a tool called WorkSpaces Application Manager so administrators can add apps for users and make some required and others optional. All of it gets added to a monthly AWS bill. Benefits include extending the life of desktops and keeping corporate information separate from personal info.

Fierce Telecom reports that Cogent and Level3 are both considering filing complaints with the US FCC, testing the section of Open Internet rules regarding Interconnection. That section does not regulate interconnects but opens the way for the FCC to investigate complaints and possibly add rules. CEO of Cogent Dave Schaeffer told the National Journal his company might be forced to file a complaint. General Counsel for Level 3 Mike Mooney said it is evaluating options. Both companies will have to wait until 60 days after the rules are published in the Federal Register before they can file complaints. Monday’s edition of the Federal Register coinatins the new rules.

The Next Web reports New Zealand TV broadcasters MediaWorks, Sky TV and TVNZ sent cease and desist letters to a number of ISPs including Slingshot and Orcon, over the use of IP addresses that make users appear to be in the US. The media companies mind because the service can be used to watch the US version of Netflix which has different content than the New Zealand version.

BizTechAfrica notes figures from the Nigeria Communications Commission show a strong increase in GSM use in January. Mobile Internet subscribers rose 5,570,038 in January to a total of 81,892,840 mobile Internet users in Nigeria. MTN NIgeria has the most at 39 million followed by Globacom, Airtel and Etisalat in that order.

Extreme Tech has the news that Intel has teamed up with supercomputer company Cray to build a new computer system capable of reaching up to 180 petaflops. Currently, China’s Tianhe-2, considered the most powerful supercomputer on the planet as of last November, is 54.9 petaflops. The new system will be built at the Argonne National Laboratory and will be part of a joint collaboration between that facility, Oak Ridge, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The system will be comprised of two computers, one for testing and prototyping and one for comparing prices between Groupon and Living Social. It’s worht pointing out that the US has blocked sales of supercomputer parts from Intel to China.

Ars Technica reports Microsoft released a Windows 10 Technical Preview for phones. Build 10051 adds the new Project Spartan browser, outlook branded mail and calendar apps, and new universal apps for phone and messaging. Folks in the fast update cycle will get it first. Devices running Windows Phone 8.1 need to use the Insider App to get the update.

News From You:

KAPT_Kipper gave us a heads up on this Verge story covering a Facebook blog post responding to a Belgian report critical of its privacy policies. The report accused Facebook of making it impossible to opt out of tracking and in some cases tracked users who had never used Facebook. Facebook’s said “a bug” affected “a few” users and would be fixed. In addition what the researchers called “tracking,” Facebook argued should be called receiving “standard web impressions.”

tm204 posted a research note from the University of Cambridge describing how a new understanding of electromagnetism could lead to antennas small enough to be integrated into computer chips. This would allow a big improvement to wireless communciation. Essentially the researchers propose electromagnetic waves are generated from a phenomenon known as symmetry breaking, which as a sidenote could help merge classical electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. For makers of the Internet of Things it means piezoelectric materials like lithium niobate or gallium nitride can be used to make small effective antennas right inside the chip.

Spsheridan sent us the disturbing news that Italian surgeon Sergio Canavero has a volunteer for the world’s first human head transplant. According to The Independent, 30-year-old Russian Valery Spiridonov who suffers from a severe form of spinal muscular atrophy has volunteered for the 36 hour operation requiring the assistance of 150 doctors and nurses. Some scientists have called the idea “not possible” and “ludicrously stupid.” The operation leads to the possibility that the man’s body could reject the new head which led Dr Hunt Batjer, president elect of the American Association for Neurological Surgeons to say “there are a lot worse things than death.” Have a great weekend everybody!

 

Discussion Section Links:  

 http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/10/us-amazon-com-aircraft-idUSKBN0N103Z20150410
http://www.engadget.com/2015/04/10/amazon-drone-testing-faa-us/?ncid=rss_truncated
http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=82485
 http://www.faa.gov/uas/legislative_programs/section_333/333_authorizations/media/amazon_com_11290.pdf

 

Pick of the day:

Here is something else to use those computer sticks for.

I work at a medium size school district and we use the FREE cloud based RiseVision.com service to display information on TV’s district wide. This marquee/display service lets you link you content to many google services and rss feeds. Currently we use raspberry pi devices stuck to the back of big tv’s to display our content. The new computer stick would allow us to deliver better content such as video. Rise Vision actually has some huge companies including many airports, colleges and food chains. Check them out at http://risevision.com

Jeff from Warm, Windy and Friendly Corpus Christi Texas

Messages

Colby identified a critical point about YouTube’s subscription plan:

“YouTube had to force content creators to accept the new terms or turn off revenue. It would be a terrible user experience if you pay $10/month and some channels still have ads because the creators refused to switch to the new model.”

Toby Pinder from uncharacteristically sunny England added:

“Youtube only has a limited number of ads they can serve from their paying pool of advertisers. If a significant enough chunk of users are no longer viewing advertisements …users that aren’t part of the subscription program see more ads as the system has more to show them.

Eventually this might lead to user backlash as people might believe YouTube is trying to push too many ads in order to send them to the subscription service.”

And Roberto Villegas wrote:

“I would pay $10 in a heart beat to get rid of ads and if it came down to it cancel others services to absorb the cost such as Netflix. The majority of my watching habits are going to youtube. From a creators standpoint I am also for it. I fully understand the issue the anonymous million subscribe has, but Google gets to set the terms of service. … Ultimately, I think this change is a good one and may force creators to make things that are less optimized for ad revenue and push for more quality programming. I’d love to see more long form content on YouTube, but I know I’m in the minority. ”

Bryan thinks there are 2 “camps” forming among the smartwatch followers:

Camp A seems to want everything that a smartphone has (apps, mobile internet, touch screens, etc.), in their smartwatch. They want an device independent of their smartphone.

I think those (like yourself) ask “Why would I want a smartwatch? I already have a smartphone.” This is why they may not interest a lot of people. It’s redundant.

Camp B (which I’d include myself in) see the smartwatch as a way to:

1. Get quick info (time, date, weather, notifications, next appointment)
2. Perform quick actions (Media player control, reply to an SMS with “Yes, No, OK, and other app-specific actions)

The watch isn’t meant to replace a smartphone, it’s to complement it. Camp B therefore would get a lot more out of the Pebble, since that’s exactly the scope the Pebble watch aims for (and succeeds in.)
And of course, 1-week battery life, always on display and a significantly lower price-point doesn’t hurt either.

Love the show!
#LetsGoCards
#LetsGoBlues

Chris from Harrisburg, PA thought we should take a look at. The Olio Model One coming this summer:

“They are doing a limited run of 1000 and just recently dropped the price of the watch by $250.00 (to $345-$545). The watch appears to be well constructed and designed so that it could be upgraded down the road as technology changes. It will work on both Android and Apple and is a closer competitor in my mind to the Pebble watch.

https://www.oliodevices.com/index.php

Xindi in Verdant Virginia compliments the show:

Tom, you are pronouncing Xiaomi beautifully and correctly!! Please continue to avoid using any and all Z sounds when speaking this company’s name! Xi in Mandarin sounds a lot like the English “she.” I guess to write it phonetically for an American English speaker, you might quickly run together the English words “she” and “yow” or “ow” (sheyow) and add on “me.” As you are currently doing.

Pronunciation is difficult to explain in text because everyone speaks uniquely. Only I wanted to reassure you. Hope this helps.

=====

Monday’s guests: Anthony Carboni

DTNS 2468 – YouPayTube

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comJustin Young joins the show to talk about what YouTube’s coming subscription plan means for viewers and creators.

MP3

Using a Screen Reader? click here

Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org.

Please SUBSCRIBE HERE.

A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible.

If you enjoy the show, please consider supporting the show here or giving 5 cents a day on Patreon. Thank you!

Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme!

Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo!

Thanks to our mods, Kylde, TomGehrke, sebgonz and scottierowland on the subreddit

Show Notes

Today’s guests: Justin Robert Young

Headlines: 

Apple announced today that orders for its Apple Watch will only be taken online during the initial launch period. TechCrunch asked how long that would last, but Apple had nothing to add. Meanwhile the Verge has a Google “source close to the development team” that says Android Wear watches are close to being able to work with iPhones through a companion app.

Microsoft and Dropbox expanded their integration today. According to TechCrunch, Dropbox users can now click the Open button when previewing a file on the web and select an option to edit using Office Online. Users can also save new files to dropbox from within Office Online. The feature is available to Dropbox for Business customers who have an Office 365 license, and Dropbox basic and pro users. Dropbox says over 35 billion Office documents are stored on its service presently. Microsoft has over 1.2 billion Office users.

Reuters passes along data from a Pew Research Report that Facebook is still the most popular social network among teens, despite a dip in total teen users over the last few years. 71% of teens 13-17 use the service. Instagram is at 52% and Snapchat in third at 41%. Facebook is not so popular with 27-year-old Max Schrems and the 25,000 users that joined a lawsuit accusing Facebook of violating privacy cooperating with the US NSA. FAcebook’s lawyers began the first day of hearings by challenging Schrems standing to bring the case.

TechCrunch reports Xiaomi sold 2.12 million smartphones during their 12 hour “Fan Festival” Sale yesterday. Celebrating Xiaomi’s 5th birthday the 12 hour fan festival was held across 7 Asian countries, including India, Indonesia, and Malaysia, and brought in RMB 2.08 billion (US$335 million) of revenue. In addition to the phones, 38,000 Mi TVs and more than 770,000 smart appliances were also sold. This event broke the record of its previous best flash sales event.

CNET reports Adobe has lots of updates coming to its Creative Cloud video tools. Project Candy uses Augmented Reality to capture palettes from your iPhone’s cameraor stored photos, for use in Premiere and After Affects. Character Animator has face-tracking algorithms that map a characters face to your own to create more realistic facial movements and sync with speech, using data from a new app called Face Tracker. Think Andy Serkis, without ping pong balls.

 Samsung warns that the Galaxy S6 Edge will be in short supply according to Engadget. In a Reuters report Samsung mobile head J.K. Shin revealed production yields of the phone’s curved glass screen are low and will not be able to keep up with anticipated demand. Samsung is “working hard to resolve the difficulty in supply,” but yields could be low “for a while.” The issue will not affect the Galaxy S6 with its conventional display.

News From You:

Starfuryzeta submitted the TechCrunch article that LinkedIn will purchase online learning company Lynda.com. The acquisition is expected to close sometime in Q2. LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner hopes the acquisition can help job seekers with education and skill acquisition.

KAPT_Kipper alerts us to Amazon taking a legal stand against review mills. The e-commerce titan’s lawsuit targets one Jay Gentile (if that is his Reeeal name) who sold reviews via sites buyreviewsnow.com, bayreviews.net, buyazonreviews.com and buyamazonreviews.com. The Seattle Times notes that Mark Collins apparently owns buyamazonreviews.com, not Gentile, but Collins is not named in the suit. This is the first lawsuit Amazon has ever filed regarding the pay for play review practice despite it being an established industry for anyone looking to pad their star count for coin.

TheLazyOne wants to call our attention to a BBC report from yesterday that Google has purged almost 200 extensions rom its catalogue of browser add-ons after a security reviews. Google enlisted several security experts to research how extensions from multiple browsers behaved when visiting Google sites. The findings are due to be published in full in May at the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy.

Discussion Section Links:  

 http://www.theverge.com/2015/4/8/8371131/youtube-paid-subscription-offline-video
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-04-08/google-plots-new-youtube-subscription-service-as-soon-as-this-year

 

Pick of the day:

Your about GPS tracking constituting an unreasonable search under the Fourth Amendment remind me I wanted to recommend Supreme Podcast, produced by supremecourtreview.com.

It frames the case and offer the context to better understand it, and cuts to the relevant exchanges from the argument audio. Of course if I find a case particularly interesting, I’ll then download and listen to the full audio from supremecourt.gov. Supreme Podcast also provides analysis of the majority and dissenting opinions when they’re issued.

Supreme Podcast
http://supremecourtreview.com/default/podcast/view/
and listed on many podcast aggregators

Supreme Court Arguments Audio
http://www.supremecourt.gov/oral_arguments/argument_audio.aspx

Thanks for a great show,
Technosquid

 

Messages

Rich from Lovely Cleveland:

With all the new Macbook reviews out critiquing the performance of Core M CPU, I thought I’d point your audience to an article just posted on Andandtech about how OEM design decisions actually have as much of an impact on performance of Core M laptops as the actual CPU model. The TL;DR version: even if a CPU has a higher Turbo frequency, if the design of the machine doesn’t dissipate heat adequately, it’ll be forced to throttle its performance. This is relevant to the Macbook in that the higher spec’d CPUs might not actually perform better in many scenarios (haven’t seen any reviews though yet to verify).

http://www.anandtech.com/show/9117/analyzing-intel-core-m-performance

Trung writes:

“A New Hope won’t be Disney Movies Anywhere. It will be ultraviolet. The other five movies will be Disney Movies Anywhere.

If you search Star Wars on vudu.com, you’ll see that there’s no Disney Movies Anywhere banner on the bottom of A New Hope. If you go on disneymoviesanywhere.com, the image for A New Hope says “This movie is currently unavailable on Disney Movies Anywhere.”

Patreon backer Rob from Geelong, Australia adds:

Disney Movies Anywhere is only available to US residents. So, if you’re outside the US and buy the digital copies from any service your purchase will be locked to that service. Hooray for DRM.

Anyway, I already own all 6 movies on Blu-Ray. And DVD. And VHS. So I’m not in a hurry to buy them again.

=====

Wednesday’s guests: Darren Kitchen & Len Peralta!

DTNS 2467 – You Had Me at Scrolling

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comScott Johnson joins us to look over the first reviews of the Apple Watch. Should you buy one?

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Show Notes

Today’s Guest: Scott Johnson, chief among the Frogpants

Headlines

9 to 5 Mac reports that the 8.3 release of iOS is out. The update brings more than 300 new emojis and a new keyboard with scrolling UI to accommodate them. Siri gets new languages: English (Indian, NZ), Danish, Dutch, Portuguese (Brazilian), Russian, Swedish, Thai and Turkish, and the ability to start calls on speakerphone. Users can also set free apps to download without a password, and there’s an Apple Watch fix for apps that use continuous background location updates.

MacRumors reports the 10.10.3 update for OS X Yosemite has been released. The update includes the new Photos app, more than 300 emoji characters, adds Spotlight suggestions to look up, prevents Safari from saving website favicon URLs in private browsing and support for Google 2 step verification. The Photos App is a replacement for Aperture and iPhoto and integrates with the iCloud Photo Library and Photos for iOS app.

CNET reports AT&T has settled with the US FCC over data breaches in Mexico, Colombia and the Philippines that resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of almost 280,000 US customer names, Social Security numbers, and other protected data. AT&T agreed to pay a $25 million fine and offer credit monitoring to all affected customers as well as hire a compliance manager.

Ars Technica reports banking consultant Faisal Kahn recently found a Microsoft application to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) to become a Money Services Business (MSB). That is a step a company might take it it wanted to develop its own mobile payments platform. Windows 10 for phones will support Host Card Emulation.

CNET reports HTC announced the HTC One M9+ will come to China though no date has been set. The M9+ has a 5.2-inch screen with 2K resolution, a 20-megapixel Duo Camera and a fingerprint sensor. Inside you’ll get a 2.2GHz MediaTek Helio X10 octa-core processor.

Ars Technica reports that Tesla’s Model S 60 is being replaced by the Model S 70 D, which features a 70 kilowatt hour battery and dual motors, and extends the electric car’s range to 240 miles, for a cost of $75,000. A Tesla Motors spokesperson said that with tax incentives and savings in gasoline, the Model S 70D ” “becomes competitive with $55,000 cars like the Mercedes E class and BMW 5 series.” Because you buy a Tesla to save money.

Tom just got this email from YouTube: “We’re excited to build on this momentum by taking another big step in favor of choice: offering fans an ads-free version of YouTube for a monthly fee. By creating a new paid offering, we’ll generate a new source of revenue that will supplement your fast growing advertising revenue.”

TechCrunch reports Facebook has launched a standalone Web version of Facebook Messenger available at Messenger.com. The English language version is rolling out now with more versions to come.

 

 

 

News From You:

TooMuchScrolling sent us the Tech Crunch report that Xbox One owners in the US and Canada can now get oan over the air television dongle just liek their European friends, if they buy the $80 Hauppauge WinTV-955Q TV tuner and an HDTV antenna. And if they are a part of the Xbox One Preview program. And if they are in range of an over the air TV signal. But once all that is in place, users can pause programming for 30 minutes, use the Xbox one’s snap feature to split the screen between television and games, and over-the-air channels can be streamed to Xbox One SmartGlass apps on Windows, Windows Phone, iOS and Android for remote viewing.

starfuryzeta pointed out an interesting bit of code-examining from Myce.com. Optional Windows Update KB3035583 which showed up as recommended March 28, ads a folder to System32 called GWX whcih contains 9 files and a folder called download. One of the files description is “Download Windows 10.” More code sleuthing revealed clues about how you’ll be notified of the free Windows 10 upgrade and how it will proceed. Head over to M-Y-C-E.com if you want all the details.

Dersch42 and GeekCitizen submitted stories about a CNN report that attackers who breached the US State Department system fro months also gained access to an unclassified White House computer system. The system has access to US President Barack Obama’s private schedule. Congressional officials briefed on the investigation have called the intrusion the “worst ever” cyberattack intrusion against a federal agency.

 

Discussion Links: 

http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-apple-watch-reviews-20150408-story.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/technology/personaltech/apple-watch-bliss-but-only-after-a-steep-learning-curve.html?_r=0
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2015-04-08/apple-watch-review-you-ll-want-one-but-you-don-t-need-one
http://recode.net/2015/04/08/how-other-smartwatches-stack-up-to-apple-watch/
http://www.theverge.com/a/apple-watch-review

 

Pick of the Day:

I’ve been reading up lately on security and end-to-end encryption, and while I’m no expert, I did blog about it while staying at a Holiday Inn.

There are a couple different ways to encrypt communications. PGP is a general purpose mechanism that works on files, email, and even dick pics (pardon my French). PGP is great, but it can be tricky to setup for the average user. S/MIME is great for email encryption but only works in that medium.

That brings me to my suggestion for end-to-end message and voice encryption on a mobile device.

Signal for iOS
TextSecure/RedPhone for Android
Web interface in the works

The apps interoperate and use Off The Record (OTR) Messaging for securing their communications. It’s a pretty simple solution that the average user can do to help encrypt their communications. All apps are available from Whisper Systems: https://whispersystems.org/#privacy

This topic might be a good extra feature for the Patreon supporters. Get Daren from Hak5 and maybe a couple other guests and do a special all-in on what needs to be done to improve secure communications.

Bonus material: Glenn Greenwald has a great TED talk about Why Privacy Matters: http://www.ted.com/talks/glenn_greenwald_why_privacy_matters?language=en. I also found this article very interesting on what the journalist needed to do in order to communicate with Edward Snowden: https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2014/10/28/smuggling-snowden-secrets/


Kevin… from my nondescript mobile device.

Message of the Day

Hey Tom,

Just wanted to follow up on your conversation, from yesterday, about Star Wars finally becoming available for digital download. I wanted to suggest letting everyone know that since Disney owns Star Wars now, you can use the Disney Movies Anywhere app to be able to access the Star Wars movies from a variety of devices, as long as you purchase them from either iTunes, Google Play, or Vudu and have your accounts linked through the Disney app. Now hopefully Disney will make a deal with Amazon and Xbox movies in the future to make accessibility even greater.

Even though we all wish for DRM free movies, this does help us “watch what you want, when you want m on any device you please” for Disney, Marvel, and now Star Wars Movies.

If you don’t have a pick for today, I would suggest the Disney Movies Anywhere app.

Keep up the great work!


Zac from Indy | ADigitalFix.com |

========

As s former HBO GO user, I am blown away by HBO NOW. The interface is about the same, but the streaming quality (backed by MLB tech) is fantastic, smooth, and let’s you “scrub” to a location smoothly. Maybe it’s because it’s day 1 and not the Game of Thrones Premiere, so demand wasn’t crushing them, but so far it’s the best streaming service I’ve used.

Mike in rainy Northern Virginia

====

Tom and Jennie:

On the show yesterday there was some additional discussion around making tech stories accessible to the masses.

I was thinking about how well Richard Feynman made very complex technical subjects very accessible to anyone who cared to pick up his books. He utilized some very nuts and bolts real world examples and analogies that made the subject matter very accessible, yet never really pulled any punches by dumbing down the subject matter. He also added a dash of wit and humor which made them more relatable. He is probably a good example of how this can be done really well. Others who write in this arena such as Stephen Hawking, Carl Sagan and Brian Greene are also good examples of how to do this well.

Thanks.

Russell

=====

Hi Tom,

Since you talked about accessibility testing on recent shows, I thought I’d mention another company that does that: 3 Mouse Technology (http://3mousetech.com/). 3MT is an accessibility consulting company that does both testing and development.

Anyway, keep up the great work!

====

Joseph: A really good one already exists, it’s called google. Just type whatever you are searching for and add “gif” and VOILA! You can find a gif JUST LIKE THIS

Matt

Tomorrow: Justin Robert Young

DTNS 2466 – Charge and Not Catch Fire

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comPatrick Beja talks with us about Connecticut’s ‘pole neutrality’ plan for gigabit fiber, and how John Oliver may have pointed the way towards explaining other tech and security topics.

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Show Notes
Today’s guests: Patrick Beja

Headlines: 

Tech Crunch reports that HBO Now is available from Apple and Cablevision. The new service, announced back in March, provides access to HBO’s entire streaming content library, as well as new shows as they air for $14.99/month. If you sign up now you get one free month. Unlike HBO Go, the service doesn’t require a user to subscribe via their cable or satellite TV provider.

Business Insider has a screenshot of what appears to be a memo from Apple’s SVP of Retail and Online Sales that reads, “The days of waiting in line and crossing fingers for a product are over for our customers.” It asks employees to encourage customers to order the Apple Watch and new MacBook pro online. The source who leaked the memo says UK shoppers will ONLY be able to order the Watch online.

The Next Web brings us the news that Twitter is expanding the “Quote Tweet” button. Once the update rolls your way, the RT button will now embed the tweet instead of just quoting it as text, leaving you 116 characters with which to comment. The new Quote Tweet button is rolling out to iPhone and Web users now and Android users in the near future. And according to TNW, there are plans for Twitter’s API to support the updated feature.

TechCrunch reports Xiaomi is changing its ways in India.
The company will allow Amazon India and SnapDeal to sell Mi products online. Flipkart already does so. Physical stores from Airtel and The Mobile Store will carry Mi products as well.

The Telegraph reports that an Australian court ordered local ISPs to turn over details of thousands of customers who’s IP addresses are associated with Torrents of the film Dallas Buyers Club. The ISPs argued it would be “Economically pointless” for the producers to try recover the value of each copy of the movie valued at less than $10 Australian, and that a single sliver of the film was shared from each IP address meaning copyright infringement was minor.The judge disagreed and felt deterring piracy was important enough to issue the order but limited what the plaintiffs could do with the information. Peter Wells wrote us about this and pointed out that ” any letters sent to customers will need to be court approved – so no one gets a terrifying email.”

Susan Crawford has an interesting post on BackChannel describing how the US state of Connecticut plans to roll out gigabit fiber to its citizens. The key was requiring owners of poles to obey a Single Pole Administrator to open up pole access. Participating cities then proposed ways they could aid fiber rollout like expedited permitting and now are considering responses. The New England Cable Television Association claims Connecticut already has adequate capacity and the plan would cost taxpayers.

 

News From You:

The Corley sent us story from Rdmag.com thatStandford professor, Hongjie Dai and his colleagues have developed rechargeable aluminum batteries that use graphene foam for the cathode to make a safer alternative to lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries. The new aluminum battery prototype has shown “unprecedented charging times” of down to a minute and charge-discharge cycles of more than 7500 times. A lithium-ion battery lasts for around 1000 cycles. The capacity per weight is no betetr than lead acid which is significantly lower than lithium ion.

KAPT_Kipper shared an ArsTechnica story that newly elected board member of the Bitcoin Foundation, Oliver Janssens, declared the group effectively bankrupt in a blog post. He wrote: “Members have a right to know that the current board failed to tell them the truth, and that their way of running the organization resulted in it going bankrupt.” The non-profit’s 2013 tax filings showed it ended that year with more than $4.7 million in total assets. No 2014 financial details have been released.

GeekCitizen sent us this Engadget update. This Friday the Star Wars movies will be available as digital downloads through iTunes, Google Play, Xbox, Playstation, Vudu and others. Extras will include featurettes for each film and interviews with key contributors. The complete set is listed on Vudu for preorder at $90, and Google Play lists each movie for $20 each. And yeah, they’re the special editions.

Dmmacs sent the Android Central writeup of the news that Amazon finally supports Android tablets for Amazon Prime Instant Video in the UK.  Amazon Prime came to tablets in the US last week.  Users have to get the app from the Amazon App store which has to be installed by allowing non-Google Play store apps.

 

Discussion Section Links:  

 http://www.engadget.com/2015/04/06/john-oliver-snowden-interview/?a_dgi=aolshare_reddit
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/feb/24/people-ignore-security-warnings-browsing-web

 

Pick of the day:

Mike from lovely (and very, very dry) Fremont, CA here.

For a very well done “parody” Twitter account, I suggest that everyone check out @SwiftOnSecurity. She hits all the major nerd buttons: Info Sec information that rivals HAK5 (a tall order) with a lot more snark; pithy warnings about the rise of the machines and their inevitable dominion over us clueless humans; and some great links. I look forward to her tweets every day.

Please keep up the great work and thanks.

Mike

 

Messages

Katie: I have probably missed the moment, but I wanted to share with you some thoughts about the Amazon Dash button. I am a Mom of three who has bought all my diapers through Amazon Subscribe and Save for years. I have tried several times to subscribe to other household items, but every time I find I am horrible at predicting how often I actually need to buy new stuff. I usually end up just canceling the subscription. With the Dash button I don’t have to figure it out – I can just push a button when I need more. If they can tie this in with some kind of discount/reward system like the subscription discounts I am all in.

Greg from the finally getting warmer Quad Cities of Iowa and Illinois: “I am a Systems Analyst for a good size school district and have been following the Chrome on a stick development. With PCs doing the same, it is really going to help with keeping computers updated within schools. Now as long as we purchase decent monitors that include an HDMI port we can update computers more often.”

LWATCDR:
1. Signage. How many places use an HD tv as a sign today? With a built in PC you can update them over wifi.
2. Schools, office, government, kiosks all could use them in a managed environment.
3. A home PC. My monitor has a USB Hub on it. Plug the stick into the USB port on the monitor and the then plug in the monitor and you have an all in one PC that do a lot of basic tasks.

Rich from Lovely Cleveland: “I don’t think the idea of Apple putting a fanless Core M CPU and a couple of USB-C connectors in a tiny aluminum slab is completely outlandish, although …Apple loves a dramatic reveal of a refreshed product design, and they could follow in the iPod tradition and call it the Mac Nano. Just a thought.”

Frank in Indy is a program manager at an Ed Tech software company and they use accessibility testing firms all the time for their products. He writes: “Deque (“Deck-Q”) and (a href=”http://www.ssbbartgroup.com”> SSB Bart Group are 2 that I’m familiar with. They will test for color blindness, sight, and hearing impaired access and navigation for your website or application. There are also certifications available like those at http://www.section508.gov/, referred to as “section 508 compliance”.

Chris from surprisingly spring like Amesbury (a mile from Stonehenge) emails about the discussion on checking for accessibility:

For someone interested in this there are two sites I’d reccomend.
http://gameaccessibilityguidelines.com/ gives a good list of easy, intermediate and hard changes that you can make to make your game or app accessible to a wider audience.”

And then he has a site he co-runs: “At ergohacks.com one of the things we do is take products and apply that checklist mentality to it. We do a conventional review then look at it from the perspective of someone with visual problem, hearing,control or mobility problems, ease of use and trigger warnings and whatever else will be relevent.

=====

Wednesday’s guest: Scott Johnson!

DTNS 2465 – PC Pick-up Sticks

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comTodd Whitehead is on the show today to talk about the Intel Compute Stick, Chromebit, and the future of PCs on a stick.

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Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme!

Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo!

Thanks to our mods, Kylde, TomGehrke, sebgonz and scottierowland on the subreddit

Show Notes

Today’s Guest: Todd Whitehead, head geek of Alpha Geek Radio 

Headlines

Reuters reports Twitter complied with Turkey’s request to remove photographs of a hostage taking by left-wing militants in Istanbul last week, causing a block on the site to be lifted. YouTube is among several sites that remained blocked. An Istanbul judge ordered access blocked to social media sites showing photographs of the slain prosecutor, Mehmet Selim Kiraz. Presidential spokesman said a prosecutor had demanded the block because of concerns the images could be used to spread terrorist propaganda. Twitter says Turkey filed more than five times as many content-removal requests than any other country in the second half of 2014.

(more…)

DTNS 2464 – Headlines Only

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comSince Len and Darren both had conflicts, and it’s the Good Friday holiday in some parts of the world, Tom just talks about the main headlines and reads a few extra emails.

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If you enjoy the show, please consider supporting the show here at the low, low cost of a nickel a day on Patreon. Thank you!

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Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo!

Thanks to our mods, Kylde, TomGehrke, sebgonz and scottierowland on the subreddit

Show Notes

DTNS 2463 – Fastlanta

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comJustin Young is in to talk about Comcast’s 2Gbps Internet in Atlanta and why it took them so long. Are finally seeing competition in the US?

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A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible.

If you enjoy the show, please consider supporting the show here or giving 5 cents a day on Patreon. Thank you!

Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme!

Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo!

Thanks to our mods, Kylde, TomGehrke, sebgonz and scottierowland on the subreddit

Show Notes

Today’s Guests: Justin Robert Young, DTNS contributor and co-host of Night Attack, Weird Things and the JuRYmore podcast

Headlines

Reuters reports Google and Mozilla will no longer trust new domain certificates issued by the China Internet Network Information Center, which allocates and certifies IP addresses and domain names. The actions come after CNNIC issued an unrestricted intermediary certificate to Egypt’s MCS Holdings. Through human error the certificate was installed in a firewall device and generated certificates for domain names owned by Google, making man in the middle attacks possible. Google has removed CNNIC root certificates from Chrome though it is whitelisting existing certificates for a limited time. Ars Technica reports Mozilla will no longer trust certificates with a notBefore date on or after April 1st. Both companies said CNNIC can reapply for full inclusion. CNNIC called the Google decision “unacceptable and unintelligible.”

Reuters reports that Microsoft’s popular mobile scanning app Office Lens is coming to iOS and Android. The app uses the camera to take a photo of an item, crops the image and stores it in Microsoft’s One Note or OneDrive cloud storage app, or can save the image as a word file, Powerpoint presentation or PDF. It uses OCR for searchable text, and it’s FREE.

It’s time to check in on which Silicon Valley company Europe is regulating today! WSJ says the European Commission asking companies that filed complaints against Google for permission to publish some information in advance filing charges in the five-year-old antitrust investigation.

I got one! Marketwatch says government privacy regulators from France, Spain and Italy have joined the Netherlands, Germany and Belgium investigating Facebook handles personal information. At issue is combining information from multiple services like Instagram and WhatsApp for adsales purposes, and using like buttons to track browsing.

And for the hat trick. Don’t think you’re getting away clean Apple. Reuters says antitrust regulators are investigating Beats deals with record labels to see if they unfairly limit access to music for rival services. The EU sent out questionnaires about licensing terms and wants answers by April 17.

Just a heads up that David Pierce over at Wired has an excellent in-depth piece on the Apple Watch called “Iphone Killer: The Secret History of the Apple Watch.” Through interviews with Apple’s Kevin Lynch And Alan Dye, he tells how the watch evolved from a modified iPhone strapped to a wrist to a device with taptic feedback and finely-tuned interface.

The “App Runtime for Chrome” is a beta program that enables Android apps to run on Chrome OS. Ars Technica reports that Google will now allow any developer to run their app on ARC and allow ARC to officially run on Windows Mac and Linux versions of the Chrome browser through the Chrome App ARC Welder. So yeah Android apps can now run anywhere but iOS.

Kotaku reports the latest PS4 firmware update added a feature called Zoom which helps visually impaired players see things like text better. When in an interface or when the game is paused a button combo can zoom in on the screen and the zoomed area can be moved around with the directional pad.The firmware also allows customization of controller layouts.

Engadget reports Samsung announced its latest set of 4K TVs. The JS9500 coming later this month starts at $6500, with a curved screen, nanocrystal technology, full array local dimming backlight and PurColor. You can get it in 65-inch or 88-inch sizes. The most inexpensive of the bunch is the JU6700 series, which starts at $949.99 for the 40-inch sometime this spring.

 

 

 

 

News From You

h82or8 sent us the Lifehacker post on the results of an independent Security Audit of TrueCrypt. The results? There was no evidence of backdoors or serious flaws. Researchers did uncover a few issues regarding the random number generator and the possibility of “cache timing” attacks but these were considered a minimal threat. Bottom line TrueCrypt is still secure for most usage scenarios despite the project being halted indefinitely last year. The bigger problem is the piling up of bugs and the legal limitations of the license that prevent forks even now that the project is abandoned. Lifehacker recommends using its open-source successor, VeraCrypt.
starfuryzeta shared an ArsTechnica story that Firefox 37 has opportunistic encryption turned on by default. Opportunistic encryption, or OE, is a bridge between plaintext HTTP connections and HTTPS connections. Essentially it encrypts data to all servers configured for OE. A company might choose to do OE instead of HTTPS because it has a bunch of legacy content that will be really expensive to migrate. Critics say that’s the problem. OE could encourage delay of HTTPS implementation. Also OE can’t cryptographically validate that the server is who it says it is. Opportunistic Encryption is not as secure as HTTPS but for the end user, it’s better than nothing.

Racer_Rick submitted the Verge article about Comcast announcing 2 Gbps symmetrical fiber to the home service coming to 1.5 million residents in Atlanta starting next month. Customers must live in close proximity to Comcast’s existing fiber and accept installation of “professional-grade” equipment. No word on cost. Comcast also said it intends to expand 2gb service to 18 million homes by the end of 2015 and at least gigabit service to almost all customers in its footprint by the end of 2016.

Discussion Links: 

http://www.theverge.com/2015/4/2/8330267/comcast-2gbps-gigabit-pro-broadband
http://corporate.comcast.com/news-information/news-feed/comcast-begins-rollout-of-residential-2-gig-service-in-atlanta-metro-area
http://www.theverge.com/2013/6/6/4400382/comcast-google-fiber-gigabit-broadband-internet
http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2015/01/google-fiber-new-metro-areas.html
http://arstechnica.com/business/2015/04/comcast-merger-to-bring-8-billion-in-price-reductions-to-businesses/

 

Pick of the Day: This Week in Science

Andrew from strangely sunny Portland Oregon here and I would like to suggest the show This Week In Science with Dr. Kiki. I know that you (Tom) are aware of TWIS but I think a lot of the DTNS audience would really enjoy it. Thank you for being my daily news source for the last couple of years and I hope there are many more to come.

Message of the Day

Anonymous writes:

I just thought I could add some more context to your great accessibility discussion yesterday. I’ve been a Program Manager in Windows since Windows 7 so I’m fairly well versed in how accessibility works internally.

I was sad to hear Allison’s examples, I didn’t realize those crashes existed. I know from firsthand experience that every feature owner on every team absolutely needs to review accessibility as a core tenet before it’s approved to ship in any release. It’s right up there with privacy and security as a non-optional tenet, and will be considered a ship blocker if accessibility is not reviewed and accounted for. This has been true since long before Windows 7, well over a decade.

The way Windows works sounds very similar to iOS and Mac OS. If you use native controls, everything should be automatic from the developer’s perspective. The problems arise when developers create their own custom controls, which is often the case for many legitimate reasons.

One note, the “start button” example Allison pointed out was simply the solution for accessible users since when Windows 8 shipped, launching start required hovering the mouse in the lower left corner. For keyboard navigation there was a fake “start button” there, which also launched the start screen for screen reader users. Doesn’t sound like a bug, just a misunderstanding :-)

========

 

Tomorrow: Headlines only show

DTNS 2462 – When in Roaming

Logo by Mustafa Anabtawi thepolarcat.comAllison Sheridan joins us to talk about the world’s connectivity divide and how Microsoft’s doing making software accessible.

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A special thanks to all our Patreon supporters–without you, none of this would be possible.

If you enjoy the show, please consider supporting the show here at the low, low cost of a nickel a day on Patreon. Thank you!

Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme!

Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo!

Thanks to our mods, Kylde, TomGehrke, sebgonz and scottierowland on the subreddit

Show Notes