Apple sees iPhone revenue decrease 26% in Q3 – DTH

DTH-6-150x150Apple sees a 26% in iPhone revenue on earnings that still beat analyst expectations, Under Armour sells MyFitnessPal, and Samsung launches SmartThings Find.

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Is Your County A Swinger? – DTNS 3897

Time management coach Elizabeth Grace Saunders wrote an article for Wired called “How to Stop Getting into Pointless arguments online.” We share our views, experiences and tips.

Starring Tom Merritt, Justin Robert Young, Roger Chang, Joe

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Germany Launches a Probe Into Amazon’s “Brandgating” Policy – DTH

DTH-6-150x150Germany’s antitrust regulator launches a probe into Amazon’s “brandgating” policy, CEOs from Facebook, Twitter, and Alphabet testify before Congress on Section 230, and Marvell announces it intends to acquire Inphi.

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About Public Key Cryptography

KALM-150x150"

Tom explores the fundamental principles of Public Key Cryptography and the maths behind it.

Featuring Tom Merritt.

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Episode Script
This says its protected with Public Key Cryptography
But if everyone gets my key how is that secure?
And who the heck are Alice and Bob?!?!?
Are you confused?
Don’t be.
Let’s help you Know a Little more about Public Key Cryptography

Public key cryptography is a system to make it easy to authenticate things with whomever you want. Public keys can be given out to anyone without risk. And your private key as long as its private, ensures only you can authenticate those public keys. But how does that work? How can anyone have your public key and it not be risky?
Those of you who are experts in security or security researchers don’t cringe too much at this, I’m going to take some shortcuts in this explanation in order to make it good for people who don’t know anything about encryption.
The idea with public key cryptography is that you have a key, which is just a number really, it’s a, it’s a piece of math that you put out there that people can use to encrypt communications with you. Now they can either encrypt something sent to you, or they can read something encrypted by you and determine that it was in fact, created by you because it goes with your public key.
Now, you may think, as I did when I first heard about this, how is it possible for someone to give me the key publicly and that be secure? That’s because there is also a private key. And so the public key and the private key work well together. Now, that makes sense.
Okay, there’s a private key, you have to use the private key and the public key together, but how can I send something to someone and have them be able to decrypt it without revealing my private key?
Certainly, I must have to give the private key to the other person. In a sense, yeah, there is a system like that called symmetric key cryptography. And that underlies a lot of public key encryption schemes. But let me give you an example that shows how it’s possible to share a key and this example, we’re going to use an actual padlock and key combination.
I’m not the one who came up with this metaphor. So all credit to the person who did, but this is going to be a system where a padlock has three key states. A lock can usually be locked or unlocked, right? This padlock has the lock unlock, and then lock again. Turn the key left and it’s locked. Turn the key to the middle and it’s unlocked. Turn the key right and it’s also locked. So left or right lock.
Now imagine you have two keys for this padlock. One key can only turn to the left or middle.. The other key only turns to the right and middle.
So I think you know where I’m going with this one of those keys, the one that turns right is given out publicly to people, and you say, Okay, if you, if you have this key, you can now turn my lock to the right, but you can’t turn it to the left.
Yes they can still unlock it. Yes but only from one direction.
So what good is the public key?
Look, you’ve got my public key, the one that goes to the right, and I’ve got my key that goes to the left. So here’s what we’re gonna do. I’m gonna send you an unlocked padlock for you to send me an encrypted message. The padlock is the Public Key platform we’re using. So you take this padlock, you lock the box that your message is in, then you take my public key, which again goes to the right and you put that key in, you turn it from unlocked to locked. And here’s the thing, remember, you can’t go to the left with that public key. So now even you can’t unlock it. You just locked it. You can’t even unlock it yourself. That’s hwy it’s safe to give everybody the public key. It can only go one direction. You send that padlock box to me. I’ve got the key that can go to the left. And so I’m able to unlock it and I’m the only one. If someone in the middle grabs that box padlocked, (and we’re gonna pretend that this is a padlock can’t be picked) What can they do? Unless they have my private key, nothing.
OK but public key cryptography uses numbers not actual keys and locks. Can’t numbers just be cracked? To see how the numbers might work let’s bring in those classic cryptography players Alice, Bob and Eve.
Alice and Bob want to exchange a key, but Eve’s in the middle. A-B is the message Evil Eve wants to steal it.
So what we, Alice and Bob are going to do is use a number that we agree on “two.” Eve might know about two, that’s fine. Alice is going to pick her secret number to be three. But she doesn’t want Eve to be able to figure that out. To encrypt the secret number she’s going to raise two to the power of three, and that’s eight. That’s effectively her public key.
She sends the number eight to Bob. Now Bob has received from Alice the number eight. Now Bob has a secret key, it’s four, he’s going to raise that two to the power of four, that’s 16. So he sends that to Alice. Now Alice has the number 16. Now Eve can see all this. She can see that Alice sent Bob 8 and she can see that Bob sent Alice 16. These are the public keys. Eve does not know either Bob or Alice’s secret number though.
Here’s what’s going to be interesting. Now Alice is going to take the 16 she got from Bob, she doesn’t know Bob’s secret number is four, but she’s going to raise it to the power of three, which happens to be 4096. Which is her secret number.
Bob’s going to take the public number he got from Alice, which is eight, and raise it to his secret number, which is four, so eight to the power four, also 4096. Now they both have a secret number 4096, that Eve doesn’t know that they can use to encrypt messages to each other. they’ve shared a public key, in this case, eight and 16, based on a known factor, which is two but Eve doesn’t know 4096.
Now you might be sitting here thinking oh, well hold on, if he knows it’s two, and she sees eight and 16, it’s not gonna take a very long to figure it out with some simple math. And that is exactly the key to understanding public encryption. When you hear about weakened encryption weakened keys, it means that Eve got better at figuring things out. So of course, in our very weak example, Eve can sit there and go, Okay, well, I know two is the base. And I saw that Alice sent eight to Bob. So let me come, let me compute this. Two times two is four, four times two is eight, aha, I’ve computed that Alice’s secret number is three.
But Eve wasn’t able to just look at eight and do that. She had to do the math in her head. In other words, she had to compute it. Make that math a lot harder than our example and it becomes a lot harder for Eve to figure it out.
So the strength of public key cryptography relies entirely on how difficult that mathematical factor is. Now you can get into all kinds of things about the elliptic curve and factoring of primes. If you want to know how they actually create these numbers, but the principle is the same, which is, you create a system based on math, that the other person can come up with so that you’re only exchanging these public numbers that then Eve the person in the middle would have to spend a long time factoring.
Sure, She didn’t have to spend a long time to figure out that eight was two to the power of three. So make that much more complex, so that it takes hundreds of thousands of hours to figure it out. That’s one of the reasons you’ll hear security people often say that there is no such thing as uncrackable encryption, it’s just a matter of time, because it is all math. What you’re trying to do is come up with an algorithm that is sufficiently complex, that the amount of time it will take to crack it makes it worthless to try.
If it’s going to take me to the heat death of the universe to factor out the number, that’s pretty strong encryption. Of course, as computers get more powerful as we do things like add in natural random number generators, from quantum sources, suddenly, things get different.
But as computers get better at solving complex math they also get better at creating complex math. So it stays at parity.
Now granted, these are overly simplistic models. And there’s lots of shortcuts I took to explain them, that when you get into RSA encryption, diffie Hellman 256 bit encryption, there are caveats and things you have to know to make it work in real life. But the fundamental principle is there, which is taking a piece of math and using it to create a number that you can give someone publicly that they can then use to create a key that only the two of you know.
I hope this helps you understand the concept of encryption a little better
In other words I hope now you know a little more about Public Key Cryptography.

The Answer: 30 Facebooks and 20 Twitters – DTNS 3896

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testified before a US subcommittee about the way they use Section 230 or Safe Harbor. What did they have to do and will it change any lawmakers minds about enacting possible regulations?

Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Scott Johnson, Roger Chang, Joe

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Microsoft’s Q1 2021 Beats Expectations – DTH

DTH-6-150x150Amazon launches amazon.se in Sweden, Apple may start wirelessly charging external accessories, TikTok partners with AP on election info in the US.

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Why Netflix’s Corporate Shakeup Matters To You

While 2020 has been known for many things, one thing it will forever be remembered as, in the world of entertainment, is the year every media conglomerate opted to shake things up — and the latest of the bunch is none other than everyone’s favorite binge streamer, Netflix.

Netflix logoAs reported by THR yesterday, the big N, following the loss of Channing Dungey as the SVP of Original Content earlier this month, has decided to change some things within its corporate structure.

Up until now, Netflix siloed its content machine by genre, and then into different budget levels and territories within those genres. One exec would handle high-budget dramas while another handled low-budget sci-fi/fantasy and another took charge of Canadian imports as another managed the Irish mysteries. As you can imagine, this makes for a hell of a strange development process, which Netflix has finally realized. Starting now, the company will instead pursue a more traditional TV content model broken out by drama, comedy, event series, unscripted series and overall deals (the Shondas and Ryan Murphys of the world get to do whatever they want as long as they do it for Netflix).

Sound boring? Understandable. But, this is a pretty big deal for a company that, essentially, hates the idea of doing things the traditional way.

Netflix is a rebel. A disrupter. A– whatever buzzword you want to use for a company that thinks a way of doing things is broken simply because it’s old. But sometimes, a system is unchanged for years and years because it works. Restructuring the company into a more traditional model that lacks these “silos” will give Netflix’s creators a better understanding of just who they need to talk to for their project and help streamline the company’s content development process.

Now, instead of seeking out the head of YA/Family event shows based on New York Times bestsellers, you can just pitch to the head of drama.

More important, however, is what this move could signal for Netflix’s future. Is the company finally coming around to the fact that stacking your slate with a cavalcade of expensive loss-leader programs, while flashy, doesn’t actually produce a profit? Possibly. Could it signal Netflix is now going to be more willing to make actual television and not just ten-hour movies? Again, maybe. Could they be launching a free-tier as the idea of AVOD content continues to gain traction within the mainstream? WHY NOT?!

None of this is meant to imply we know what Netflix is going to do next but we do know one thing. Netflix is changing. Arguably, for the better. A media company cannot survive by pouring tens of millions of dollars into flashy genre shows, backed by movie stars, that get canceled after a single season.

Television is a medium fueled by shows that consistently draw audience. The medical shows. The procedurals. The multi-cam sitcoms. These are the things that make television profitable. You can only make these things when you create an environment that invites them in and supports the idea that being a consistent draw is more important than getting a headline in Variety or winning an Emmy.

Netflix has been long overdue for this kind of change and we should welcome it because, as the streaming trendsetter, what’s good for Netflix is good for everyone else. And, if everyone else goes this way, we may finally get some consistently reliable shows of these companies.

Just Like Dropping A Cat – DTNS 3895

T-Mobile will launch its streaming TV service TVision for T-Mobile postpaid customers starting November 1. Is this new business sustainable and how will it fare against the competition. Plus why has Wikipedia managed to keep its operation from being abused during this current US election cycle in the same manner as Facebook or Twitter?

Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Charlotte Henry, Roger Chang, Joe

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T-Mobile Launches Streaming TV service – DTH

DTH-6-150x150T-Mobile launches its TVision service in the US, Tinder takes video chat out of beta and AMD agrees to buy Xilinx.

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E-Commerce Begins at Home – DTNS 3894

Facebook is rolling out streaming games on the Web and in its Android Facebook app to selected users in the US, the RIAA, SAG-AFTRA and several other recording industry groups sent a letter to Jeff Bezos and Twitch CEO Emmett Shear claiming Twitch has failed to properly license music, and Researchers from Stanford and Samsung developed an OLED display with a density of more than 10,000 pixels per inch.

Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Brett Rounsaville, Roger Chang, Joe

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