Today in Tech History

Today in Tech History – September 19, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1982 – In a posting made at 11:44 AM, Professor Scott Fahlman first proposed using the characters :-) to indicate jokes on a computer-science department bulletin board at Carnegie Mellon University. In the same post he suggested :-(.

1989 – About 100 hospitals that used software from Shared Medical Systems saw their computers go into a loop when the date was entered. The day was 32,768 days from January 1, 1900, which caused a system overflow.

1995 – International Talk Like a Pirate Day was first celebrated by John Baur (Ol’ Chumbucket) and Mark Summers (Cap’n Slappy), of Albany, Oregon. They had come up with the idea on June 6th while playing racquetball, but that was D-Day. The 19th was Summers’ ex-wife’s birthday, and the only day he could reliably remember.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 18, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1830 – America’s first native locomotive, the “Tom Thumb” lost a race to a draft horse at Ellicotts Mills, Maryland.

1927 – The Columbia Phonograph Broadcasting System went on the air with 47 radio stations. Within two years it would be sold and become the Columbia Broadcasting System and later simply CBS.

1998 – The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers aka ICANN was created in order to take over Internet administrative tasks from the US Government. The most famous of those tasks is overseeing the Domain Name System.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 17, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1822 – Jean-François Champollion, permanent secretary of the French Académie des Inscriptions, presented his Lettre a M. Dacier, describing his solution to the mystery of the Hieroglyphic inscriptions on the Rosetta Stone. A nifty bit of decryption.

1991 – The first version of the Linux kernel (0.01) was posted to a Finnish FTP server in Helsinki. Originator Linus Torvalds wanted to call the OS FreaX, but the FTP admin didn’t like the name and renamed it Linux.

2007 – AOL announced plans to refocus the company on advertising and relocate its corporate headquarters from Dulles, Virginia to New York City.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 16, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1890 – Louis Le Prince boarded a train to Paris at Dijon station. Neither he nor his bags ever arrived and his disappearance was never solved. In 188 he had patented a system for taking 16 pictures a second and playing them back as a moving picture.

1959 – The first successful photocopier, the Xerox 914, was introduced at the Sherry-Netherland hotel in New York City. One of them caught fire. The demo that was carried live on television did not catch fire.

1985 – Steve Jobs spent his last day as an employee of Apple after submitting his resignation to the board.

1997 – After purchasing NeXT the previous December, bringing Steve Jobs back to the company, the Apple Board named Jobs as interim CEO, replacing Gil Amelio.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 15, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1947 – The Association for Computing Machinery was founded as the Eastern Association for Computing Machinery, during a meeting at Columbia University in New York. It developed into the world’s largest organization of computer professionals.

1947 – RCA released the 12AX7 vacuum tube for public sale. The miniature dual triode vacuum tube with high voltage gain became popular with tube amplifier enthusiasts and has been in continuous production since. The tube is also known as the ECC83 in the European Union.

2008 – Electronics retailer Best Buy acquired the Napster music service for $121 million, preventing the once dominating music-sharing service from going out of business.

2014 – Microsoft announced they would purchase Mojang, makers of the Minecraft universe. Mojang’s founders, Notch, Carl, and Jakob, announced they would leave the company.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 14, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1959 – After 33.5 hours of flight, Luna 2 became the first human-made object to strike the moon.

2000 – Microsoft released Windows ME. The ME stood for Millenium Edition but deserving or not, would eventually become code for a bad or unnecessary OS update.

2001 – The Nintendo GameCube went on sale in Japan. It was the first Nintendo game console that did not use cartridges.

2015 – The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, LIGO, detected gravitational waves of two merging black holes. It was the first direct observation of gravitational waves.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 13, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1983 – Osborne Computer declared bankruptcy in Oakland, California federal bankruptcy court, listing assets of $40 million, liabilities of $45 million, and 600 creditors. Two years earlier, Osborne had produced the first portable computer, the 24-pound Osborne I.

1985 – Nintendo released Super Mario Brothers in Japan. It became the best selling video game for 20 years until it was surpassed by Wii Sports.

2000 – The public beta of Apple’s Mac OS X, code named Kodiak, was released. Users had to pay $29.95 for the beta.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 12, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1962 – US President John F. Kennedy delivered a speech at the stadium of Rice University, declaring “We choose to go to the moon.” Many consider the speech the beginning of the space race.

1985 – Steve Jobs announced to the Apple board that he would resign. Jobs said, “I’ve been thinking a lot, and it’s time for me to get on with my life. It’s obvious that I’ve got to do something. I’m 30 years old.”

1994 – Mosaic Communications introduced its first software, the Mosaic NetScape network navigator and the Mosaic Netsite server line.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 11, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1928 – Radio station WGY of General Electric made the first simulcast in Schenectady, New York. A play called “The Queen’s Messenger” had its audio broadcast over radio with the picture in sync over television at same time.

1985 – ISEE-3, renamed the International Cometary Explorer (ICE), flew through the gas tail of comet P/Giacobini-Zinner.

1998 – The US Congress released the contents of the Starr report on the Internet. The report led to the impeachment, but not the removal, of President Clinton. The websites that hosted the report were slammed with traffic.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.

Today in Tech History – September 10, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1990 – Peter Deutsch posted to comp.archives about the Internet Archive Server called “Archie” that he, Alan Emtage, and Bill Heelan had put together. It is often considered the Internet’s first search engine.

1991 – Paul Lindner posted to comp.unix.misc introducing “The Internet Gopher” a distributed information service. Before the World Wide Web, Gopher was the primary way to find and share documents online.

2008 – The Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva,Switzerland, powered up on its quest to discover the secrets of particle physics, especially evidence of the Higgs Boson.

2013 – Apple announced two new phones, the iPhone 5S with a fingerprint scanner, and the iPhone 5C a cheaper and colored version of the iPhone 5.

Like Tech History? Get the illustrated Year in Tech History at Merritt’s Books site.