Today in Tech History

Today in Tech History – January 7, 2017

Today in Tech History logo1714 – Henry Mill patented a machine for transcribing letters “one after another, as in writing.” Sadly, he died before he perfected the first typewriter.

1839 – Louis Daguerre made the first announcement of his photographic system at the Académie des Sciences in Paris, though details were not presented until August of that year.

1954 – In New York at IBM headquarters, IBM and Georgetown University showed off their joint project on machine translation. More than 60 sentences were translated from Russian to English using eight grammar rules.

2003 – Apple released the public beta of its new browser, called Safari.

2016 – the 49th Mersenne prime was discovered by Dr. Curtis Cooper at the University of Central Missouri as part of the Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search. It was written as 2^74,207,281-1.

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Today in Tech History – January 6, 2017

Today in Tech History logo1838 – Samuel Morse, with his partner, Alfred Vail, gave the first public demonstration of their new electric telegraphic system at the Speedwell Iron Works in Morristown, NJ. They used Morse’s specially designed code to send the message “A patient waiter is no loser.”

1851 – Leon Foucault proved the rotation of the Earth experimentally. He wrote in his journal that he made the discovery at 2:00 AM working with his famous pendulum in the cellar of his house.

2004 – Apple debuted the iPod Mini, a diminutive 4GB version of the iPod available in five colors at $249.

2016 – Oculus began taking orders for the Oculus Rift VR headset. It cost $599 and came with a remote, Xbox One controller and external sensor on a stand for $599. It was also bundled with the game Lucky’s Tale and access to Eve: Valkyrie.

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Today in Tech History – January 5, 2017

Today in Tech History logo1948 – Warner Brothers showed the very first color newsreel, featuring the Tournament of Roses Parade and the Rose Bowl football game.

1972 – President Richard M. Nixon announced that NASA would develop a space shuttle system, emphasizing its reliability, reusability and low cost.

1984 – Richard Stallman began working on the GNU Operating system, a free UNIX-like OS. GNU/Linux is seen as the most successful outgrowth of that project.

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Today in Tech History – January 4, 2017

Today in Tech History logo1642 – Sir Isaac Newton was born in Woolsthorpe in England and would go on to describe universal gravitation and the three laws of motion as well as star in Neal Stephenson’s The Baroque Cycle. It was December 25th at the time now as the calendar had not yet been reformed.

1958 – Sputnik I the first manmade object to orbit the earth, fell back into the atmosphere and disintegrated, after 92 days in space.

2004 – One half of NASA’s Mars Rover team, Spirit, landed on Mars to analyze the planet’s rocks, looking for evidence of water. Its partner rover Opportunity was 21 days behind. Spirit is no longer active, but Opportunity keeps on chugging along.

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Today in Tech History – January 3, 2017

Today in Tech History logo1957 – Hamilton Electric held a press conference to announce the World’s First Electronic Watch. The Hamilton Electric 500 never needed winding, just batteries.

1977 – Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak incorporated Apple Computer Company. Ron Wayne famously backed out, selling his shares for $800. Ouch.

1999 – The US Mars Polar Lander was launched. It would spend most of the year wending its way towards Mars before it lost communication with Earth in December, presumably after crashing.

2009 – “Satoshi Nakamoto” created a virtual currency called Bitcoin posting an announcement and 31,000 lines of code on the Internet.

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Today in Tech History – January 2, 2017

Today in Tech History logo1959 – Luna 1, the first spacecraft to reach the Moon, was launched by the USSR.

1979 – Dan Bricklin and Bob Frankston incorporated Software Arts for the purpose of developing VisiCalc, the world’s first spreadsheet program.

2004 – NASA’s Stardust spacecraft successfully flew past Comet Wild 2, collecting samples it brought back to Earth two years later.

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Today in Tech History – January 1, 2017

Today in Tech History logo1939 – In a garage in Palo Alto, California, William Hewlett and David Packard founded Hewlett-Packard a little company that made audio oscillators– and later TouchPads.

1983 – A new Internet and Transmission Control Protocol (Yep called IP/TCP by some at the time, weird I know) went into effect on the ARPANet, replacing the Network Control Protocol. The result was a new ARPA Internet combining ARPA hosts of the time.

1985 – The Nordic Research Network NORDUnet registered the first domain name NORDU.NET.

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Today in Tech History – December 31, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1923 – The chimes of Big Ben were broadcast on radio for the first time by the BBC, beginning a new year’s tradition.

1938 – Cops in Indianapolis put Indiana University professor Rolla Harger’s drunkometer to its first practical New Year’s Eve test as a breath analyzer. Suspected drunks blew into a balloon and the air was mixed with a chemical solution that turned darker the more alcohol was present. The more portable Breathalyzer replaced the drunkometer in 1958.

2001 – Microsoft provided its last day of support for Windows 95 making it officially “obsolete” according to the Microsoft Lifecycle policy, after only six years.

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Today in Tech History – December 30, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1873 – A number of gentlemen in New York City founded the American Metrological Society, feeling that a change to the Metric System was needed by civilized nations. 100 years later they’re defunct and gallons, miles, and Fahrenheit rule the US.

1913 – Dr William David Coolidge received his patent for improvements in tungsten and methods for making filaments in incandescent lights. It made light bulbs last a lot longer. Too bad that in 1928, GE got a court to declare the patent was not an invention.

1924 – Astronomer Edwin Hubble announced that he had found stars in the spiral nebula Andromeda, and using Leavitt’s formula measured them as 860,000 light years away proving Andromeda was a separate galaxy. He would go on to find a dozen more galaxies.

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Today in Tech History – December 29, 2016

Today in Tech History logo1949 – TV station KC2XAK of Bridgeport, Connecticut became the first ultra high frequency (UHF) television station to operate a daily schedule.

1952 – The first hearing aid using a junction transistor went on sale, the model 1010 was manufactured by the Sonotone Corporation in Elmsford, New York, US.

1959 – Physicist Richard Feynman gave a talk called “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom“, in which he suggested it should be possible to make nanoscale machines that can arrange atoms the way we want.

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